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tv   [untitled]    August 4, 2010 3:30pm-4:00pm PST

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we made the school as beautiful as possible to take the children's minds off their problems. it was also crippled children. this might sound familiar to you if you know the history of president roosevelt. he was paralyzed by polio on the threshold of a promising career. he came back and few americans knew how disabled he was. he learned compassion. he learned he could help other people of different races that
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he never met before. this is what we used his inheritance for. this lead to the polio vaccine. this is one person who reveres him. suzie. she was born with clubbed feet. it's now for spinal diseases. these were men put to work. you could go to a library and check out toys. these are three themes i identified. beauty, permanence. this is a minor's wife.
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she doesn't look like a dorothy lang photographer. i am sure she felt better. these are stair cases in new deal buildings. part of the idea, i think this is really an expression of the old arts and crafts movement, which elnor roosevelt was part it. this was a janitor, once he checked me out, he said, come on in, i have to show you something. there was a beautiful wood laid
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mosaic. this is a marble mosai c. this is at the national zoo. and there's the beautiful rock work. they didn't build porto potties. this is a restroom in yosemite. we discovered these above phoenix. then there's art work which celebrates people doing ordinary but indispensable stuff. this is up at timber line lodge. they were not used to seeing
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them or getting classes in journalism. they would get people in trouble. sometimes the art or the artist got in trouble. let's look at a few of the structures around california. this is built by the wpa. the noblist motive is the public good. imagine anybody saying that today. this kind of work is a noble endeavor. county courthouses like this one in alameda. city halls all over california in a variety of styles. this one is at burbank. it hasn't been touched.
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fire stations all over the place. and police stations and armories. this is the police stables in golden gate park and public libraries. and then one at north berkeley. public hospitals. clinics and sanitary. as well as polio people did get tuberculosis. remember that counties were strapped for funds. so the wpa gave it to them. children got health care. we were headed for a national health care system. we treat things differently now. essentially, what we have of
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med-cal is going to be slashed true. as an environmentist, i am opposed to this. they laid concrete in southern california. without which, a good deal would be washed into the ocean. the ccc and the wpa workers were trained for disaster relieve. we didn't have to rely on the national guard. these kinds of things wouldn't be as disastrous. we need a new wpa. they are walking over the sidewalks, which is wpa. this was a demonstration
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outside of dianne feinstein's office. and demanding it not be torn down. the new deal moved in and gave rural areas water and electricity. this is one in modock county and we have cheaper electricity. and then, there were sustainable communities, people think they are discovering this at this time. this one was done in georgia. this is one in maryland green belt outside of washington d.c. this is right outside of the co-op. and then urban roads like this in the los angeles river and
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this is being built. this is mira loma park. this is lark merced blvd. it's all made of clay. it's going to slump. these are the roads built in the oakland hills. nate, red woods. skyline. and enabled them to go up and develop the hills. the rural roads that go through the coast range. this enabled them to get their stuff to market. this is at road built by the ccc. this is a bridge. this is highway one and you won't know, except you look at
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the bridge and you will see dates, 1938, 1939. the airstrips are ccc. and the one out at treasure island. long beach, burbank. this is oakland and the whole built line railroad was redone. 19 is a pwa project and our great amphitheatres are from that time. this is santa barbara bowl. this is the forest theater in carmel and these are ccc workers putting huge bolder.
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here's 6 thousand people getting ready to enjoy oklahoma in that theater. big basin is a ccc project and this one, on the east river, new york. a project built where people from the lower east side could see performances and still do. our parks and recreation. almost all from them. that's the conservatory garden and i photographed that all the time. this is up at jeweliard park. i thought i would show you san francisco. i read they improved every park. i didn't believe this at first.
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this is the fly casting pools. here was a fly casting champion ship. here it is today. it's still in use. the stables out there. they are meant so the public would have the opportunity previously only available to the elite, as it so often the case, as is with golf. like lincoln park built by the wpa. think of the experiences that people have had and the history which is embodied in them. there is daves tennis stadium. here it is, this was a tournament for inner-city youth. archery at golden gate park.
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our play grounds. here it is in use today. this is bernal heights park. you can still see the gutters they put in there. this is buena vista parks. this is quezar park. this is mount davidson. look out for the rock. this is on telegraph park. this is stern grove. this is a little known park above candle stick. here's my friend jake, standing by a wall.
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this was rosy play ground. they turned it into a park and it was also restored by wpa. i believe they torn down the house, which was unforgivable and the zoo is wpa. and here's the murals inside the mother's building. the marina sea walls and great aquatic park. the palace of fine arts. we wouldn't have and a little further in, lake merit, this pier. alva rado park and then, some of you my recognize this.
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the berkeley rose garden. did it have to be this beautiful. finally, i'm going to wrap up. san francisco is rich in the various kinds of arts projects. we have a fabulous collection of stuff here. there were four components. there was visual arts, federal theater, federal musics and federal writers. they employed many people. this is excellent to show the work. the visual arts project. it was especially important in san francisco because of dieggo rivera and radicalizing it. this is the coit towers.
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this was done under cw a. 1934. the wpa wasn't in existence. this is the very first of the relieve projects. harry hopkins said, they have to eat too. the artists should dig ditches like everybody else. this is antonio brinko. millions of americans got to hear live music for the first time. this is the federal theater project. this is maxine albroro. it's been destroyed and one of my favorites done by helen
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bruten. it's to remind us, while i was looking at these projects, they employed 42 percent women. it's very unusual in the art world. and then of course, in san francisco, benny lafono. we had the first and the last of the new deal. coit tower is the first. it is i think, one of the best in the country. it shows san francisco's history and that of human civilization shown through the eyes of labor. these are things that happened in san francisco's history.
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lynchings. again, coit tower, shows you the stock market dropping. something people weren't used to seeing. and a business many being held up. and in george washington high school, the farther of our country pointing the pioneers west as they walk over a dead indian. most of the art is not controversial. most of the artists celebrates local produce. this is one of the most extraordinary murals i have seen. at a tuberculosis cemetery. they also painted a mural in san francisco. finally, it's on the outside of
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the berkeley community theater. all people brought together through the arts. unfortunately, it was not the last. the war came along. and anton refurgie. there were controversial. there were tried in washington in 1953. he had a panel showing the arts and sciences. there is luther burbank and jack london. there was a thing on the side.
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it says federal art project and has beginning and ending date. that is a wall which becomes a tomb stone. the artists themselves are becoming ghosts. that's what he's doing there. joseph danish. head of the projects, it is it was a wonderful time that he woke up every morning wondering how long it would last. they were being paid to produce public art. well, what happened of course is the war. the war came along. and roosevelt could see it coming. so, very few people understand the new deal segways into war.
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they beefed up the military bases like fort mason. my 1943, they are all killed. the war did what the new deal couldn't do, full employment. there were reports, it's still with mind numbing statistic. we have to rely on other people to do it. the these projects enriched the lives of millions of people and does so today all the time. i have become aware of it, but very few people are. i have also become aware
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extraordinary people. here's a dedication of roosevelt. on the left, who painted the murals in the social security building with her husband and steph an kennedy. it's been a privilege to meet these people. just recently, i found this statue of roosevelt. is over looks oslow harbor. they revere roosevelt, because of what they learned from the new deal about how to build a civil society. they didn't get rid of it, they expanded it. just like other scandinavian
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countries are consistently rated as the happiest in the world. the new deal continues to live on there. thank you. [applause].
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>> san francisco's buses and trains serve many riders who are blind or how low vision. muni is their lives line to get around. simple act of courtesy can help them access muni services safely. it is not just courtesy. it is the law. >> i used to take the 21 airlock. >> lot of times, when i would be waiting at the bus stop, the door would open and the driver would announce the bus line. >> 71. >> it is easier and preferable when a driver sees someone who is obviously visually impaired if they stop in front of me and
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say "this is the 71," "this is the seven." >> our buses are setup to announce the lines when we pull up. when i see a customer with a guide dog or cane, make sure i let them know what line i am. >> every time i get on the bus, i tell the driver where i need to get off, even if i think there digital voice system is going to announce that. just so they know in the event that it is not working. i would say a good amount of the time, i do get acknowledgment, actually. >> good morning. >> morning. is your announcements system working? >> i'm sorry, it is not. >> could you let me know when we get to van ness and sacramento? >> i sure will. >> i have had a number of drivers be really helpful in terms of getting passengers to move down a few seats so i can
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sit in the front. >> can somebody give this lady a seat? >> the bus driver was say, "please wait a moment. i want to make sure you have a seat." and i hear him or her announced that he needs a seat for a person with a disability. >> as soon as the person gets on the bus, i ask the passengers if we can have a seat for this person. >> anybody help us? thank you, sir. >> thank you. >> sides, federal law requires that the customers give their seats to the elderly and disabled if they should need it. >> buses should stop in zones that can accommodate multiple lines will stop behind one another. i cannot see what bus is behind -- i'm not even sure if there is a bus behind. the second bus does not come up to the front.
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oftentimes, it has caused me to be passed up by bosses, by trains, and again, it makes me late for appointments. it makes me late for my job. >> i'm often anxious that i'm going to miss the bus that i need, simply because i'm not fast enough to scamper down and find out which bus is lined up behind the bus that is currently in front of me. what i'm going to work and i take the van ness street buses to work, sometimes, one of them will pull up right next to the other one. not in a bus stop, but parallel to it. and i do not know it is there. i also do not feel comfortable walking out into the street. >> is that my boss over there? i think that is my boss -- bus. i'm going to miss it. i don't know how many times i have missed buses because of
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this. >> i do not double park. it is not safe for our customers, and especially the visually impaired. anything could happen, and it is muni's policy not to double park. normally what i do, if i can safely go in behind, i pull in the zone, offload my customers, load the customers that are waiting for me. when the bus in front of the leaves, i will pull to the front for the customers that did not see me. >> sometimes, the bus pulls up, and there is stuff in my way because the boys -- bus has not pulled up right in front of me. i have to figure out how to get around or through. i have to navigate through all of that in order to get onto the bus. >> when i pick up a visually impaired customers, i like to pull up right in front of them, make sure nothing is in the way so they can walk right on the
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coach. >> okay, take one big step forward. >> when i drop off a visually impaired customers, make sure you do not pull up at the shelter. you want to give them a straight shot so they can go to the left or the right. you want to pull in front or behind the shelter. never around any trees or pose. i usually let them know that they have about 10 feet before you. a straight shot, and wallace 10 feet away, and they can make the decision what they want to do from that point. every now and then, and visually impaired customer wants to be dropped off right at the shelter. so they can go to the left or the right from there. >> ok, you want to take one big step when you step off. the shelter is straight ahead. >> if i get on the bus and asked a bus driver to please tell me when to get off at seven straight, the bus driver very often will tell me to just look
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at the sign, and i will say that i cannot see the sign because and visually impaired. sometimes, the bus driver gets it. some of the time, the bus driver does not get it at all. it is really difficult when you do not see well to understand where things are. it is one of those issues where people do not see it from the outside. so when they see me having problems stepping off of curbs or stairs or running into the side of a building or things like that, it would appear to them as though maybe i had been drinking, but the problem is that there is no contrast between a great building and a sidewalk. >> it is difficult for some drivers i think to understand that i am blind. although i may look like i'm getting along very well, and it did happen to me on several occasions with drivers

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